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MilliDelta robot surgeon is the size of a one cent coin

3 hours 3 minutes ago
Another tiny robot is gearing up to join the ranks of microsurgeons, but this one is small enough to fit in your coin purse. Inspired by pop-up books and origami, the milliDelta bot measures mere millimetres when unfolded (roughly the size of a one c...

3D printers could let you produce your own drugs

4 hours 2 minutes ago
You might imagine that drug production only happens at gigantic pharma corporations with millions of dollars worth of equipment. However, researchers at the University of Glasgow have unveiled a new process of building "reactionware," or small reacto...

FilmStruck's alternative streaming service is coming to the UK

4 hours 24 minutes ago
A movie streaming service backed by Warner Bros. and Turner is launching in the UK in the "coming weeks," the pair have announced. FilmStruck has been lighting up screens in the US since late 2016, and will arrive across the pond with a slightly diff...

LWN.Net Celebrates Its 20th Birthday

4 hours 30 minutes ago
Free software/Linux news site LWN.net just celebrated its 20th birthday, with publisher Jonathan Corbet calling the last two decades "an amazing journey." LWN published the first edition of their weekly newsletter on January 22, 1998, and Corbet (who also contributes to the Linux kernel) writes today that "It has been quite a ride. We in the free-software community set out to change the world, and we succeeded beyond our wildest expectations." Here's how he described their second edition the next week... We were arguably helped by the lead news in that edition: Netscape's decision to open-source its "Communicator" web browser. That quickly brought the world's attention to open-source software, though that term would not be invented for a few months yet, and to Linux in particular. LWN was a shadow of what it is now, but it was evidently good enough to ride on that wave and establish itself as a part of the Linux community. Corbet reviews the highlights. ("Companies discovered our little hobbyist system and invested billions into it, massively accelerating development at all levels of the system...") But he also adds that "Through all of this, we also got to learn some lessons about successfully running a community information source on the net." For the last 16 years the site has supported itself with $7.00-a-month subscriptions, offering early access to their Weekly Edition plus subscriber-only mailing lists, "allowing our content to quickly become part of the community record." Plus, through events around the world, "we have met -- and become friends with -- many of our readers and many people in the community as a whole. This community is an amazing group of people; it has been a honor and a joy to be a part of it..." "The free-software community's work is not done, and neither is ours. "

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EditorDavid

Kano Computer Kit Complete review: A fun DIY 'laptop' that teaches kids to build PCs and code

4 hours 34 minutes ago

Make your own laptop. Learn to code. Hack Minecraft. The tantalizing promise of Kano’s Computer Kit Complete ($250 at Target and Kano’s website) is made clear right on the front of its brightly colored packaging. This charming kit for kids contains everything you need to build a Raspberry Pi 3-powered PC, explaining the basic concepts behind every step of building a computer, then seals the deal with a friendly operating system designed from the ground up to teach children the thought processes crucial to coding. And every step is fun!

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Brad Chacos