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Meet Amazon's #1 Reviewer, a Quirky Woman Who Loves Battery Chargers

Gizmodo - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 08:01

Ali Julia may or may not be her real name. But to the complex and influential world of Amazon reviews, Ali Julia is a name to be reckoned with. The mysterious Boston woman with an affection for computers and battery chargers is the number one ranked reviewer on Amazon. She sounds a little quirky, too.

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I poured soy sauce all over my hydrophobic white shirt (hands-on)

CNET News - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 08:00
A new all-cotton hydrophobic shirt from Threadsmiths runs a liquid gauntlet full of coffee, tea, soy sauce and wine.






65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:23
MojoKid (1002251) writes Tech support scammers have been around for a long time and are familiar to most Slashdot readers. But last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it had issued lawsuits against several culprits responsible for tech support scams. Now Microsoft has announced that it too is going after tech support scammers. According to the company, more than 65,000 complaints have been made about tech support scams since May of this year alone. Bogus technicians, pretending to represent Microsoft, call the house offering fake tech support and trick people into paying hundreds of dollars to solve a non-existent issue. If successful in their ruse, the scammer then gains access to a person's computer, which lets them steal personal and financial information and even install malware. I managed to keep one of these guys on the phone for about 20 minutes while I stumbled through his directions, over and over, "rebooting," pretending to be using Windows, etc; the next one caught on my quickly. Have they called you? If so, how did the call go?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google lawsuit forces MPAA-backed attorney general to retreat

EnGadget - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 07:20
Remember that post Google put up this week that accused the MPAA of trying to resurrect the spirit of SOPA with the help of state prosecutors (that included evidence based on some of Sony Pictures' leaked emails)? It just turned into a lawsuit -- and...

Dystopian Fiction’s Popularity Is a Warning Sign for the Future

Wired Top Stories - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 06:00

In the latest episode of Geek's Guide to the Galaxy, writer Naomi Klein discusses dystopian fiction and her new capitalism-vs.-the-climate nonfiction book This Changes Everything.

The post Dystopian Fiction’s Popularity Is a Warning Sign for the Future appeared first on WIRED.








While You Were Offline: 30,000 People Buy Bull Poop, George R.R. Martin Freaks Out Over The Interview

Wired Top Stories - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 06:00

From the reactions to Sony pulling The Interview to the end of the beloved Serial, a lot happened on the Internet last week. Catch up here.

The post While You Were Offline: 30,000 People Buy Bull Poop, George R.R. Martin Freaks Out Over The Interview appeared first on WIRED.








Volvo's bike helmet concept alerts riders and drivers to each other

EnGadget - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 05:14
You know what will go perfectly with those futuristic rocket-powered, heartrate-monitoring bikes? This smart helmet that Volvo wants to create. It's a two-way system that works by uploading both cyclists' and drivers' locations to Volvo's cloud. Whil...

North Korea denies attacking Sony, offers to help investigate (updated)

EnGadget - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 04:38
North Korea has ratcheted the absurdity level of the Sony hack up a notch by pleading its innocence again and even offering to help find the real perpetrators. The FBI recently blamed North Korea for the attack that forced Sony Pictures Entertainment...

Tor Network May Be Attacked, Says Project Leader

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 04:31
Earthquake Retrofit writes The Register is reporting that the Tor Project has warned that its network – used to mask peoples' identities on the internet – may be knocked offline in the coming days. In a Tor blog post, project leader Roger 'arma' Dingledine said an unnamed group may seize Tor's directory authority servers before the end of next week. These servers distribute the official lists of relays in the network, which are the systems that route users' traffic around the world to obfuscate their internet connections' public IP addresses.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How a 3D Printer Let a Dog Run For the First Time

SlashDot - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 01:35
Nerval's Lobster writes Ever since 3-D printing began to enter the mainstream, people have discussed the technology's potential for building prosthetic arms and legs for human beings. But what about doing the same for dogs? In one of those videos that ends up circulated endlessly on the Internet, a dog named Derby, born with a congenital deformity that deprived him of front paws, is outfitted with a pair of 3-D-printed prosthetics. With those "legs" in place, the dog can run for the first time, at a pretty good clip. Both the prosthetics and the video were produced by 3D Systems, which builds 3-D printers, and it seems likely that other 3-D-printing companies will explore the possibility of printing off parts for pets. And while the idea of a cyborg pooch is heartwarming, it will be interesting to see how 3D printers will continue to advance the realm of human prosthetics, which have become increasingly sophisticated over the past decade.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google needs partners to actually build its self-driving car

EnGadget - Sat, 12/20/2014 - 01:33
After helping push the entire automotive industry forward when it comes to autonomous driving, it appears Google is ready for some help with its own driverless cars. As the leader of the project told The Wall Street Journal, the folks in Mountain Vie...

Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

SlashDot - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 22:55
wiredmikey writes Just hours after the FBI and President Obama called out North Korea as being responsible for the destructive cyber attack against Sony Pictures, US-CERT issued an alert describing the primary malware used by the attackers, along with indicators of compromise. While not mentioning Sony by name in its advisory, instead referring to the victim as a "major entertainment company," US-CERT said that the attackers used a Server Message Block (SMB) Worm Tool to conduct the attacks. According to the advisory, the SMB Worm Tool is equipped with five components, including a Listening Implant, Lightweight Backdoor, Proxy Tool, Destructive Hard Drive Tool, and Destructive Target Cleaning Tool. US-CERT also provided a list of the Indicators of Compromise (IOCs), which include C2 IP addresses, Snort signatures for the various components, host based Indicators, potential YARA signatures to detect malware binaries on host machines, and recommended security practices and tactical mitigations.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








An extreme case of how some people use social media to get attention

Gizmodo - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 22:44

Remember Me is a typical boy-cheats-on-girl story that turns into a surprising tale of someone so narcissistic that he would do anything to get attention. Add Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to the mix, and things get crazy fast. It's exaggerated, yes, but I'm sure you know people like this online—and in real life too.

Read more...








A true survival story about a crazy fishing trip gone wrong

Gizmodo - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 21:41

Red Bull is animating crazy surfer stories and this one from surfer Dean 'Dingo' Morrison is a doozy. It starts when he decides to buy a boat to try and catch the biggest fish he can. But him and his friends get too drunk and capsize the boat and end up swimming from island to island in search of rescue.

Read more...








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