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Microsoft Now Makes Money From Surface Line, Q1 Sales Reach Almost $1 Billion

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 18:07
SmartAboutThings writes Microsoft has recently published its Q1 fiscal 2015 earnings report, disclosing that it has made $4.5 billion in net income on $23.20 billion in revenue. According to the report, revenue has increased by $4.67 billion, compared to $18.53 billion from the same period last year. However, net income has decreased 14 percent compared to last year's $5.24 billion mainly because of the $1.14 billion cost associated with the integration and restructuring expenses related to the Nokia acquisition. But what's finally good news for the company is that the Surface gross margin was positive this quarter, which means the company finally starts making money on Surface sales. Microsoft didn't yet reveal Surface sales, but we know that Surface revenue was $908 million this quarter, up a massive 127 percent from the $400 million this time last year. However, if we assume that the average spent amount on the purchase of this year's Surface Pro 3 was around $1000, then we have less than 1 million units sold, which isn't that impressive, but it's a good start.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Some Like It Hot Just Might Be The Funniest Movie Ever Made

Gizmodo - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 18:02

There are tons of hilarious performances in the history of modern movies, but Jack Lemmon's turn in Some Like It Hot is absolutely, positively, one of the funniest—if not the funniest—of all time.

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A Google Executive Just Crushed Felix Baumgartner's Free Fall Record

Gizmodo - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 18:00

Move aside, Felix Baumgartner. Alan Eustace, a senior vice president at Google, fell from the top of the stratosphere this morning, plummeting nearly 26 vertical miles in the span of about 15 minutes. In doing so, he has broken Baumgartner's 2012 record for world's highest-altitude free fall – and by a pretty sizable margin.

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The different ways animals breath in one cool animated graphic

Gizmodo - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:59

Science illustrator and animator Eleanor Lutz—the same who brought us this cool graphic of how animals fly —has created this cool animated illustration showing the differences between animal breathing: Human vs birds vs insects. Even if you paid attention at biology class, it's interesting to watch.

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Nest owns Revolv's home automation tech now, too

EnGadget - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:58
Google's adding another member to its household family that includes Nest and Dropcam, and this time its home automation outfit Revolv. The firm's website lists it as "a Nest company" now, and goes on to to assure existing customers that they're...

Lady Gaga's 'Cheek to Cheek' coming to Amazon Instant 4K, PBS

CNET News - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:45
​If you're a fan of Lady Gaga, Tony Bennett or changing outfits every three minutes, 'Cheek to Cheek Live' will be televised on PBS tonight, and on Amazon Instant 4K later in the year.






Scientists discover 64P comet stinks and has dunes just like Earth

Gizmodo - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:36

The spacecraft Rosetta keeps surprising everyone with amazing new photos taken in pursuit of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken just 7.4 kilometers from its surface. These images reveal dunes just like those you can find on Earth. Scientists have also found that it really stinks.

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Crave Ep. 180: Help battling robots cause even more mayhem

CNET News - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:35
The robot war might be televised (on the Web at least) and it's a fight to the finish. The RoboGames could become a Web series if a crowdfunding effort meets its goal.






Top-rated reviews of the week (pictures)

CNET News - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:30
This week, CNET editors reviewed products from some of the big names in consumer electronics -- Apple, Amazon, Nintendo -- but Pioneer's flagship AVIC 8000NEX navigation and multimedia receiver was the one that impressed us enough to earn a Spectacular rating as well as the coveted Editors' Choice Award.






Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline

SlashDot - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:22
New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google makes a strategic move, crowns Sundar Pichai as head of product at Google

PC News - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:03

We have a saying around the Greenbot newsroom that the most exciting tech-centric news usually hits on Friday afternoons. Google just dropped a Friday afternoon news bomb.

Recode reports that Google CEO Larry Page has transferred leadership of all core Google products over to Sundar Pichai, who was formerly head of Android and Chrome OS. He will serve as Senior Vice President of all Google products and will manage a number of divisions, including business and operations, access and energy, Nest, Calico, Google X, corporate development, legal, finance, and business, which includes ad sales. YouTube is not included in the deal because CEO Susan Wojcicki will continue to run that division somewhat independently.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Nico: These Days

Gizmodo - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:00

Nico's version of "These Days" is the perfect fall song. It's the kind of music best listened to in solitude, sipping tea and contemplating failure and the nagging sense of unspecific loss that accompanies the passage of time and the change to a chillier season.

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