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States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:31
An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:31
An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:31
An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:31
An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:31
An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:31
An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NASA Will Reformat Mars Rover's Flash Memory From 125 Million Miles Away

Gizmodo - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:00

NASA's Opportunity rover is still trundling across the surface of Mars, more than 11 years after its 90 day mission began . But its software is getting bogged down, so NASA's doing a full system backup, memory wipe, and reboot. It's just like your routine computer cleanup, just from the next planet over.

Read more...








These Pizza Hut cats want to serve and entertain you

CNET News - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 13:45
Pizza Hut Japan has a new Web series -- "Pizza Cat" -- about cats running one of its restaurants. We'll take extra mozzarella with that meow, thanks.






Review roundup: Intel's 8-core Haswell-E is the fastest desktop CPU ever

EnGadget - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 13:30
Since it was teased in March, enthusiasts have been itching to see how Intel's 8-core Haswell Extreme Edition processor (the i7-5960X) performs. It has now launched (along with two other Haswell-E models) and the reviews are in. Yes, it's the world's...

NASA's Competition For Dollars

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 13:20
An anonymous reader writes: We often decry the state of funding to NASA. Its limited scope has kept us from returning to the moon for over four decades, maintained only a minimal presence in low-Earth orbit, and failed to develop a capable asteroid defense system. But why is funding such a problem? Jason Callahan, who has worked on several of NASA's annual budgets, says it's not just NASA's small percentage of the federal budget that keeps those projects on the back burner, but also competition for funding between different parts of NASA as well. "[NASA's activities include] space science, including aeronautics research (the first A in NASA), technology development, education, center and agency management, construction, maintenance, and the entire human spaceflight program. The total space science budget has rarely exceeded $5 billion, and has averaged just over half that amount. Remember that space science is more than just planetary: astrophysics, heliophysics, and Earth science are all funded in this number. Despite this, space science accounts for an average of 17 percent of NASA's total budget, though it has significant fluctuations. In the 1980s, space science was a mere 11 ½ percent of NASA's budget, but in the 2000s, it made up 27 percent."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Facebook says not to believe the rumors, wants you to trust its Messenger app

PC News - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 13:00

You’ve probably read the rumors by now: Facebook’s Messenger app records your movements! Spies on your conversations! Kills baby unicorns! Facebook wants you to know that it’s doing nothing of the sort.

In a statement from Peter Martinazzi, a member of the Facebook Messenger development team, the social media company explains that Messenger doesn’t actively listen in or watch you through your phone’s on-board camera and microphone. Instead, it asks to use your camera and microphone so you can make audio chats, or send photos and videos to your friends.

From the statement:

“Like most other apps, we request permission to run certain features, such as making calls and sending photos, videos or voice messages. If you want to send a selfie to a friend, the app needs permission to turn on your phone’s camera and capture that photo. We don’t turn on your camera or microphone when you aren’t using the app.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

11 Reasons Email Is the Worst

Gizmodo - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 13:00

Email is one of those things that's just a part of your life, period. Most of us know someone who has closed their Facebook account or refused to join in the first place in a little foot-stomping stand by their ego, and you might even know someone who is thrilled with themselves for not owning a smartphone.

Read more...








Obama: Social media makes us see how messy the world is

CNET News - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 12:47
Speaking at a Democratic Party fund-raiser, the president says social media lets us see the minute details of the world's hardships.






New Panoramic Images Show Area 51’s New Mystery Hangar Is Gigantic

Gizmodo - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 12:38

Earlier this month, Foxtrot Alpha brought you an exclusive analysis of new satellite images that show the construction of a massive new hangar in a remote part of Area 51 . Now, high resolution panoramic photos have emerged of the base confirming just how monstrous this new hangar truly is.

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Ask Slashdot: Best Phone Apps?

SlashDot - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 12:12
An anonymous reader writes: The phone app ecosystem has matured nicely over the past several years. There are apps for just about everything I need to do on my phone. But I've noticed that once an app fills a particular need, I don't tend to look for newer or potentially better apps that would replace it. In a lot of areas, I'm two or three years out of date — maybe there's something better, maybe not. Since few people relish the thought of installing, testing, and uninstalling literally hundreds of apps, I thought I'd put the question to the Slashdot community: what interesting, useful new(ish) apps are you aware of? This can be anything from incredibly slick, well-designed single purpose apps to powerful multi-function apps to entertainment-oriented apps.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








High-tech pipe organ to blow minds at famed SF theater

CNET News - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 12:01
The city's Castro Theatre, known as much for its colorful organ concerts as its quirky film offerings, will house a massive $700,000 pipe-digital hybrid featuring a sample library used in the film industry.






Airline Seats, iPhone 6, Viral Hoaxes, How We Watch Porn, and More

Gizmodo - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 12:00

Well folks, September is almost here, and you worked hard. Hard enough to earn yourself and everyone else a long weekend. Here are the best stories we wrote this week, in case you missed them while you were workin' hard for the money.

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Coin customers left fuming after getting shut out of beta program

CNET News - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 11:30
Unless customers got their orders in early -- and we mean very early -- they'll now have to wait until spring 2015 to get their hands on Coin's all-in-one credit card.

You Can Now Access All Of Richard Feynman's Physics Lectures For Free

Gizmodo - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 11:30

The lectures of Nobel Prize winning physicist Richard Feynman were legendary. Footage of these lectures does exist , but they are most famously preserved in The Feynman Lectures. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now you can access it online, in its entirety, for free.

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Here's How Anatomically Impossible That Spider-Woman #1 Cover Is (NSFW?)

Gizmodo - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 11:08

A few weeks ago, our pals over at io9 showed the Milo Manara cover illustration for Spider-Woman #1 in all its as(s)tounding opposite-of-majesty . Now, a Redditor did a 3D rendering to show just how ridiculous that pose is, from an anatomical standpoint. Some nudity and a lot of weirdness ahead.

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